Sep 14, 2014
554 notes
victoriousvocabulary:

BOSQUE
[noun]
Spanish: forest; woods; grove.
Etymology: from Late Latin boscus, from Proto-Germanic *buskaz, “bush, thicket”.
[Cory Godbey]

victoriousvocabulary:

BOSQUE

[noun]

Spanish: forest; woods; grove.

Etymology: from Late Latin boscus, from Proto-Germanic *buskaz, “bush, thicket”.

[Cory Godbey]

Sep 14, 2014
1,900 notes
Sep 14, 2014
121 notes
mytoecold:

My best friend

mytoecold:

My best friend

Sep 14, 2014
11,713 notes

(Source: btyciane, via doctorwho)

Sep 11, 2014
18 notes
pharrfromheaven:

Miguel Guerra, a PSJA North High School classmate of mine, wrote a really great piece titled “From My Street to Main Street”. It appears in a book titled Global Mexican Cultural Productions. I am sharing an excerpt of this because I remember when they were doing this play at PSJA North, as I was part of the tech theater 3rd period class. I wasn’t part of the techies that stayed after school or traveled with this troupe, but I was friends or acquaintances with this cast and crew. 

pharrfromheaven:

Miguel Guerra, a PSJA North High School classmate of mine, wrote a really great piece titled “From My Street to Main Street”. It appears in a book titled Global Mexican Cultural Productions. I am sharing an excerpt of this because I remember when they were doing this play at PSJA North, as I was part of the tech theater 3rd period class. I wasn’t part of the techies that stayed after school or traveled with this troupe, but I was friends or acquaintances with this cast and crew. 

Sep 11, 2014
82,554 notes
dynastylnoire:

every single morning

dynastylnoire:

every single morning

(Source: clairey92, via thekrissychula)

Sep 9, 2014
129,445 notes
If anyone slaps you on the right cheek, turn to them the other cheek also
Matt 5:39

This specifically refers to a hand striking the side of a person’s face, tells quite a different story when placed in it’s proper historical context. In Jesus’s time, striking someone of a lower class ( a servant) with the back of the hand was used to assert authority and dominance. If the persecuted person “turned the other cheek,” the discipliner was faced with a dilemma. The left hand was used for unclean purposes, so a back-hand strike on the opposite cheek would not be performed. Another alternative would be a slap with the open hand as a challenge or to punch the person, but this was seen as a statement of equality. Thus, by turning the other cheek the persecuted was in effect putting an end to the behavior or if the slapping continued the person would lawfully be deemed equal and have to be released as a servant/slave.   

(via thefullnessofthefaith)

THAT makes a lot more sense, now, thank you. 

(via guardianrock)

I can attest to the original poster’s comments. A few years back I took an intensive seminar on faith-based progressive activism, and we spent an entire unit discussing how many of Jesus’ instructions and stories were performative protests designed to shed light on and ridicule the oppressions of that time period as a way to emphasize the absurdity of the social hierarchy and give people the will and motivation to make changes for a more free and equal society.

For example, the next verse (Matthew 5:40) states “And if anyone wants to sue you and take your shirt, hand over your coat as well.” In that time period, men traditionally wore a shirt and a coat-like garment as their daily wear. To sue someone for their shirt was to put them in their place - suing was generally only performed to take care of outstanding debts, and to be sued for one’s shirt meant that the person was so destitute the only valuable thing they could repay with was their own clothing. However, many cultures at that time (including Hebrew peoples) had prohibitions bordering on taboo against public nudity, so for a sued man to surrender both his shirt and his coat was to turn the system on its head and symbolically state, in a very public forum, that “I have no money with which to repay this person, but they are so insistent on taking advantage of my poverty that I am leaving this hearing buck-ass naked. His greed is the cause of a shameful public spectacle.”

All of a sudden an action of power (suing someone for their shirt) becomes a powerful symbol of subversion and mockery, as the suing patron either accepts the coat (and therefore full responsibility as the cause of the other man’s shameful display) or desperately chases the protester around trying to return his clothes to him, making a fool of himself in front of his peers and the entire gathered community.

Additionally, the next verse (Matthew 5:41; “If anyone forces you to go one mile, go with them two miles.”) was a big middle finger to the Romans who had taken over Judea and were not seen as legitimate authority by the majority of the population there. Roman law stated that a centurion on the march could require a Jew (and possibly other civilians as well, although I don’t remember explicitly) to carry his pack at any time and for any reason for one mile along the road (and because of the importance of the Roman highway system in maintaining rule over the expansive empire, the roads tended to be very well ordered and marked), however hecould not require any service beyond the next mile marker. For a Jewish civilian to carry a centurion’s pack for an entire second mile was a way to subvert the authority of the occupying forces. If the civilian wouldn’t give the pack back at the end of the first mile, the centurion would either have to forcibly take it back or report the civilian to his commanding officer (both of which would result in discipline being taken against the soldier for breaking Roman law) or wait until the civilian volunteered to return the pack, giving the Judean native implicit power over the occupying Roman and completely subverting the power structure of the Empire. Can you imagine how demoralizing that must have been for the highly ordered Roman armies that patrolled the region?

Jesus was a pacifist, but his teachings were in no way passive. There’s a reason he was practically considered a terrorist by the reigning powers, and it wasn’t because he healed the sick and fed the hungry.

(via central-avenue)

IT’S BACK

(via dynastylnoire)

(via thekrissychula)

Sep 9, 2014
2 notes

(Source: idiotblush)

Sep 7, 2014
2,436 notes
Libraries will get you through times of no money better than money will get you through times of no libraries.
Anne Herbert (via duttonbooks)

(via prettybooks)

Sep 7, 2014
300 notes

Margaret Atwood's new work will remain unseen for a century

unabridgedchick:

writersflow:

Does this make anyone else want to research cryogenic preservation?

AMAZING. (Maybe pretentious.) But also, AMAZING.

(Source: victoriousvocabulary)

Sep 7, 2014
369,639 notes
official-maximum-ride:

Decided to take a video while flying this morning.
Best. Idea. Ever.

official-maximum-ride:

Decided to take a video while flying this morning.

Best. Idea. Ever.

(via thekrissychula)

Sep 7, 2014
101,084 notes
In 2002, having spent more than three years in one residence for the first time in my life, I got called for jury duty. I show up on time, ready to serve. When we get to the voir dire, the lawyer says to me, “I see you’re an astrophysicist. What’s that?” I answer, “Astrophysics is the laws of physics, applied to the universe—the Big Bang, black holes, that sort of thing.” Then he asks, “What do you teach at Princeton?” and I say, “I teach a class on the evaluation of evidence and the relative unreliability of eyewitness testimony.” Five minutes later, I’m on the street.

A few years later, jury duty again. The judge states that the defendant is charged with possession of 1,700 milligrams of cocaine. It was found on his body, he was arrested, and he is now on trial. This time, after the Q&A is over, the judge asks us whether there are any questions we’d like to ask the court, and I say, “Yes, Your Honor. Why did you say he was in possession of 1,700 milligrams of cocaine? That equals 1.7 grams. The ‘thousand’ cancels with the ‘milli-’ and you get 1.7 grams, which is less than the weight of a dime.” Again I’m out on the street.

Neil deGrasse Tyson

True story, I got called in for jury duty myself last month for the first time ever (because going to grad school and basically being a student for ten straight years got disqualified me before) and I was ready to give these exact answers so I could be all… 

on the judge, and then they dismissed all the potential jurors without even going to selection and so I was all… 

I guess I’ll have to save it for next time.

-J

(via kateoplis)

(Source: thartist72, via jtotheizzoe)

Sep 6, 2014
695,514 notes

shorm:

abaldwin360:

When confronted with a cuddly cat, the lizard simply continues to lizard.

I will never not reblog this.

(Source: ofelias, via thekrissychula)

Sep 4, 2014
997 notes
yabookscentral:

Oh, Stephen. You are our hero. 
Love, 
The YA Lit Community

yabookscentral:

Oh, Stephen. You are our hero. 

Love, 

The YA Lit Community

(via prettybooks)

Sep 4, 2014
642 notes

mymodernmet:

London-based artist Martin Tomsky's woodwork collection is filled with many elaborate illustrations transformed into wooden sculptures. To create each amazing piece, he layers together laser-cut plywood into tactile pieces filled with various textures and shades of brown.

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